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Common Spice With Uncommon Anti-Aging Power

January 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Anti-Aging, Health

I log more than 20,000 frequent flyer miles every year in my search for natural cures and remedies from around the globe. In fact, I just arrived in Africa a few days ago!

Africa is home to thousands of healing herbs that traditional healers have used to treat and prevent illness and disease for thousands of years.

Herbs are powerful medicine.

The problem is the medical industry just isn’t interested in herbs. They are nature’s medicine. You can’t patent them. So Big Pharma can’t make a profit from them.

But you don’t have to trek through the jungles of faraway continents like I do to uncover the healing power of Mother Nature’s medicine cabinet.

In fact, one of the most powerful healing herbs on the planet is probably sitting on your kitchen spice rack this very minute…

I’m talking about rosemary.

It’s one of the most commonly used spiced in America. But it was sacred to the ancient Greeks, Romans, Egyptians and Hebrews. They used it for healing and purification. They used it to stimulate the immune system… improve digestion… increase circulation… and cool inflammation.

Research confirms what the ancients knew about rosemary’s medicinal benefits. Studies show it:1,2,3

  • fights cancer thanks to its high antioxidant levels;
  • improves memory, alertness, and brain performance;
  • relieves the pain of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis in just weeks;
  • protects against macular degeneration and blindness.

Rosemary is also a powerful anti-aging herb when it comes to your skin and hair.

You see, the antioxidants in rosemary repair photo-aging like dark spots from too much sun. They also fight off free radical damage that can attack skin and lead to wrinkles and sagging. At the same time rosemary helps build healthy collagen for firm skin. It tightens loose skin, making it supple and more elastic.

Rosemary is also antiseptic. It can fight off bacteria, fungus and viruses on the skin. And it can heal minor wounds and burns, acne, eczema or psoriasis.

It also helps stimulate cell renewal and improves skin circulation. This increases blood flow and brings nutrients to the surface to make your skin glow.

As a skin cleanser, this herb reduces excess oil that can clog pores and lead to acne.4 And its anti-inflammatory powers help reduce redness and puffiness.

In addition to its skin benefits, rosemary promotes hair growth and thickness. By stimulating cell division and dilating the blood vessels, it stimulates the hair follicles to grow new hair.5

How to use rosemary for your hair and skin

For skin and hair benefits, I recommend using rosemary essential oil. This is extracted from the flowering tips of the plant. But not all essential oils are created equally. Some are synthetic. Look for oils that are organic if possible.

To promote hair growth and thickness, try using rosemary essential oil as a leave-in conditioner. It will make your hair look glossy and feel soft. This is also a good treatment for people who have itchy scalps or dandruff.

DIY Rosemary Conditioner

Ingredients:

  • 15 drops rosemary essential oil
  • 5 drops peppermint essential oil
  • 1 cup of filtered water

Directions:

  1. Bring water to boil. Remove from heat.
  2. Add essential oils.
  3. When cool, pour mixture into a spray bottle.
  4. After shampooing and while your hair is still damp, spray on the conditioner.
  5. Let your hair air dry.
  6. Use every time you shampoo or between washes to freshen up hair.

You should start to notice a boost in hair growth in one to two months. It may also help reverse graying and gently darken hair.

Don’t take rosemary essential oil internally. And dilute it with a carrier oil before using it directly on your skin. Some good carrier oils include coconut, avocado, evening primrose, olive, macadamia or rosehip-seed oil.

And don’t use rosemary essential oil if you have high blood pressure, or are pregnant.

To Your Good Health,
Al Sears, MD
Al Sears, MD, CNS

1 Wu X, Beecher GR., et al. “Lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidant capacities of common foods in the United States.” J Agric Food Chem. 2004; 16;52(12):4026-37.
2. Lukaczer D et al. “A pilot trial evaluating Meta050, a proprietary combination of reduced iso-alpha acids, rosemary extract and oleanolic acid in patients with arthritis and fibromyalgia.” Phytother Res. 2005;19(10):864-9.
3. Ibid. Tsai T-H, Chuang L-T, Lien T-J, Liing Y-R, Chen W-Y,
4. Tsai P-J. “Rosmarinus officinalis Extract Suppresses Propionibacterium acnes–Induced Inflammatory Responses.” Journal of Medicinal Food. 2013;16(4):324-333.
5. University of Maryland Medical Center, Alopecia. Accessed 12/12/16.

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Disclaimer: The information and recommendations provided on this website have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are for educational purposes only. The products offered on this site are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. You should always ask your doctor before using any products.

Al Sears, M.D., is a practicing physician with extensive experience in the fields of complementary and natural healthcare. The recommendation and materials on this site represent his opinion based on his years of practicing medicine. Any recommendations are not intended to replace the advice of your physician. You are encouraged to seek advice from a competent medical professional regarding the applicability of any recommendations with regard to your symptoms or condition. It is important that you do not reduce, change or discontinue any medication or treatment without consulting your physician first.

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